DACA

On June 15, 2012, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced its intention to give deferred action and employment authorization documents (EADs) for a period of two years to certain young people who came to the United States as children. These individuals must demonstrate that they:

  • Entered the U.S. before the age of 16
  • Have continuously resided in the U.S. for at least five years prior to June 15, 2012
  • Were physically present in the U.S. on June 15, 2012
  • Are currently in school, have graduated from high school, have obtained a GED,or are honorably discharged veterans of the Armed Forces or Coast Guard.
  • Have not been convicted of a felony, a significant misdemeanor offense, multiple misdemeanors, or otherwise present a threat to national security or public safety
  • Were not above the age of 30 on June 15, 2012.


On September 5, 2017, the Trump administration announced the phase out of the DACA program. While the future of the program and more robust legislative solutions are uncertain, there are several resources to help students navigate the complex immigration system and their options for higher education.

Advice and Resources for Undocumented Students
DACA Phase Out: What it Means for Undocumented Students and What to Do Now

For reliable and up-to-date legal information regarding the fast changing legislative future of DACA and the proposed clean DREAM Act, please visit the National Immigration Law Center.

Freedom University provides our current students with legal assistance in the DACA renewals process and covers the cost of the $495 renewal fee.